Information

An Analysis Of Social Networks' Outgoing Traffic

Using three samples of 5,000 outgoing clicks from Facebook, LinkedIn, and Twitter, I analysed the target websites. The resulting profiles of outgoing traffic, reveal widely diverging behaviours on each social network - which should give you strong clues for to how optimize your communication strategy (or ditch some platforms altogether).

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Sarunas Barauskas, Founder

Browsing Behaviour Analytics: How People Use the Internet at the Workplace

We compared global browsing averages with the typical day of browsing the Web at the office, which we established using our own user logs. Instead of focusing on single websites, we mapped the Web using 9 categories, which turned out to be much more revealing of the actual use of the Internet overall, as well as at the workplace.

Social, Entertainment and Search (SES) make up almost two-thirds of overall Web browsing. At the workplace, SES’ share drops below half of all the time spent on the Web, while the share of Shopping, Informational, Educational and Email increases from 29% to 48%.

Daily browsing patterns confirm that Search is predominantly used for personal reasons, with usage spikes during the first and last hours at the office, and during lunch. Email usage at the office spikes between 3pm and 5pm.

Then, using referer info, we looked into how people use Facebook, Twitter and Google. Facebook revealed itself to be much less of a distraction than people assume: it has become the go-to source for news and information. Twitter, on the other hand, is used exclusively for entertaiment.

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Sarunas Barauskas, Founder

How We Spend 3 Hours Per Day on the Internet

Using publicly available data, we extrapolated the average daily browsing profile of Internet users. People access the Internet through mobile apps for 90 minutes, and spend another 90 minutes on old-fashioned browsing.

Instead of focusing on single websites, we mapped the Web using 9 categories, which turned out to be much more revealing of the actual use of the Internet overall.

Most of the time is spent on social networks, almost matched by entertainment & games. Search ranks third, while news & porn come in last.

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Sarunas Barauskas, Founder

Browsing History Analytics: How it works

Every browser keeps track of all the websites you visit, unless you specifically tell it not to by switching to Private (or Incognito) Mode. This way, when you can’t remember the name of a website you found really interesting and useful, you can parse your activity log and figure out what it was.

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Sarunas Barauskas, Founder

Keep A Finger On The Pulse Of Your Workforce

Large organisations rely on multiple levels of management, with a hierarchical reporting structure. At the bottom of the org chart, employees are responsible for their own individual tasks, and report to a single manager. The information then travels up the chain of command, a process during which it is simplified and standardised, up to the C-suite, who see and act on the big picture.

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Sarunas Barauskas, Founder

ISPs Have Been Collecting And Selling Your Browsing History For Years

TL;DR: Internet Service Providers are collecting and selling your personal browsing history. This practice has been going on for years, up to the point where the FCC felt it needed to step in, and started pushing for new regulations intended to protect customers’ privacy.

One obvious way to monetise all this browsing data is user profiling. It's a big part of ISPs' business, as their SEC filings reveal. AT&T’s acquisition of Time Warner is an example of the "synergies" between ISPs’ knowledge of your interests and desires, and advertisers’ desire to shower you with targeted ads.

ISPs are using deep packet inspection to read your data stream, and are altering it, too, as numerous examples demonstrate. This is a slippery slope towards censorship, where not only ads, but Wikipedia articles as well are replaced, to "enhance user experience", as ISPs like to call it.

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Sarunas Barauskas, Founder

Make Browsing History Great Again

The History function on your web browser is the weirdest feature ever. It creates much more problems than it solves. Its main purpose seems to be to give us cold sweats. If you google "browsing history", the top results are for how to delete it. The most downloaded Chrome extension for browsing history is Click&Clean, and its purpose is, of course, to clear all your locally stored online footprints.

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Sarunas Barauskas, Founder

Wikipedia's Editors Are Censoring Themselves For Fear Of Being Tracked

Although Wikipedia allows anonymous edits, it logs the editor's IP, which could be just enough to figure out exactly who changed that controversial article on abortion. If the same IP has made an edit on an article about a local school, you can assume the person behind the edit went there. A few more clues like that one for cross-referencing, and anyone posting on Wikipedia can be tracked down. One effect of this lack of privacy has been the rise of anonymization software, such as VPNs (and Opera has just released a built-in VPN feature, by the way). Another effect is that editors censor themselves, and avoid editing controversial or politically sensitive articles, for fear of being flagged as "undesirables" at their workplace, or otherwise compromising their reputation.

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Court Says Deleting Browser History To "Avoid Embarrassment" Isn't Destruction Of Evidence

Are you allowed to delete your browsing history after receiving a court order to preserve all your digital records? Imagine the potential for embarrassment if you had to make public all your browsing history because of a lawsuit. At some level, this could become a means for leverage or even coercion: "either you cave in, or we make your browsing history public, and everyone will know what kind of porn you enjoy watching". In the case described below, a Canadian court sided with the defendant, accepting his claims that his personal browsing history had nothing to do with the subject of the case, and that he valid reasons to delete it. The defendant escaped public scrutiny of his online history - although now everyone knows there were some naughty things in there for sure.

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Federal Communications Commission To Vote On ISP Privacy Rules By End Of October

The FCC wants to tighten the rules on how Internet Service Providers (ISPs) can use their customers' private data. No regulations are in place currently, which is surprising, because ISPs own mind-boggling amounts of very personal data. They know everyone's browsing history, a fact that would make even Google droll. It's unclear if ISPs have been sharing this information with anyone (besides the NSA, obviously). The rules that are being proposed would require ISPs to get every customer's explicit agreement to be tracked. AT&T immediately opposed the new bill, with pretty clunky arguments. The real question now is, what have the ISPs been doing with our browsing histories all this time?

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Monitoring vs Blocking Internet Use

The American Management Association reckons that almost 80% of major US companies monitored their employees by the end of 2015. This included the tracking of employees’ use of e-mail, Internet, or phone. In particular, the monitoring of Internet use stood at 63%.

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Sarunas Barauskas, Founder

Using browsing analytics to monitor employee morale and stress

Continued from: Use browsing analytics to understand your employees’ mindset

A manager’s job is hard. His subordinates never tell the full story, they all pretend everything’s fine, until it’s too late. This is particularly true in challenging times, during layoffs for example, when everyone’s trying to keep up appearances for fear of being fired as well. Real communication stalls to a standstill.

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Sarunas Barauskas, Founder

Use browsing analytics to understand your employees’ mindset

Office life is a strange thing. Everyone assumes a fake character, never quite tells the truth, for fear of being singled out, or creating friction. When you have a spat with an acquaintance in your personal life, you can just avoid the person for a while, until spirits cool down. No such luck in an office, where you still have to see the guy you dislike every single day. As a result, we all put up these fake masks of cheerfulness and accomplishment, that we only take off once we’re out the door.

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Sarunas Barauskas, Founder

Google Search App Has Incognito Mode As A Feature

Private Mode can be very useful when trying to google something. Google systematically personalises search results, based on your past searches, geographical location, and scores of other parameters. It does so in an attempt to provide the results that will suit you best, at least according to its algorithms. But this can lock you up in your own Google bubble, when you're unable to access some results because of what Google thinks of you. Turning on Private Mode browsing solves this problem, and in general gives you a slightly different set of search results. Google has turned this hack into a feature in the latest update to its Search app for iOS.

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You don’t spend as much time online as you think, and it's bad for you

For the purpose of this study, we measured the actual time people in our office spent on websites, during the course of two weeks. We only measured the time when users were focused on the website’s content. If the user didn’t move the mouse, or pressed a key, the timer shut off after 15 seconds of inactivity.

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Sarunas Barauskas, Founder

How we actually browse the Internet while at work

The first concern for employers that decide to use monitoring software is an unsubstantiated belief that their employees are slacking off too much. Managers regularly walk in on their subordinates with Facebook open on their screens, and watch them hastily close the tab. Managers then naturally assume the worst; one small business owner confided to me a former secretary of his would spend four hours a day chatting with her friends.

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Sarunas Barauskas, Founder

How to track your kids’ browsing history

Kids learn most of the stuff their parents won’t tell them off the Internet, at an ever younger age. You might be offended by the idea that your little darling watches porn, but it’s the way things go. By way of example, Google returns over three million results to the query “what should I do if my kid is watching porn”.

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Sarunas Barauskas, Founder

How far can a company go to monitor its employees

Technology allows employers to monitor a wide array of their employees activities, from time spent away from their desks, to the duration of their phone calls, what websites they visit, even what they write in their emails. Although employees may feel that this surveillance is an infringement of their privacy rights, most types of monitoring are allowed by law. In cases of litigation, employees may even be surprised to what extent their (former) employer is able to produce evidence resulting from monitoring, that gets accepted by the court.

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Sarunas Barauskas, Founder

Opera launches desktop version of its free unlimited VPN

Opera just released a feature so cool it could win over a lot of Chrome and Firefox aficionados. The latest stable release version of Opera has a built-in VPN, allowing the user to anonymously browse the Internet, and choose its apparent geographical location at will. Previously, you had to pay a subscription fee to access a VPN service, around $10/month. With the new feature, you could switch countries to access blocked videos on YouTube, or stream local TV shows (such as football games) from abroad. You could also use the feature to browse the Internet without leaving your IP footprints everywhere - assuming the VPN servers will be able to handle the load.

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Why monitor what your employees are doing online

Almost every job requires the Internet now. Somewhere right now in the world, there is a yak herder going, "Why is the wifi so slow? F**k it, I’ll herd these yaks after lunch!" - John Oliver, Last Week Tonight, June 2015

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Sarunas Barauskas, Founder

If you want to track your employees, make them a part of it

Employee surveillance doesn’t increase productivity as much as one would assume. It has a lot of weird second-round effects, because employees adapt to the system and change their behavior.

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Sarunas Barauskas, Founder

Mozilla Invests In Germany’s Cliqz, A Private Search Browser

We might be angry at Google or Facebook for collecting our data and profiling us, but at the same time, we do enjoy getting relevant news stories and search results. That's why DuckDuckGo, the privacy-conscious search engine, has trouble getting traction: its search results' accuracy lags those of Google, big time. Search engines need to know something about you, to understand what you need. Cliqz, the browser that just attracted Mozilla's attention and cash, offers an innovating approach of the problem. They do most of the personalisation computations locally, on the user's computer, so that search results would be much more relevant than on DuckDuckGo, while safeguarding the user's claims to privacy. Whether this compromise between accuracy and privacy can yield good results and wider market share over time remains to be seen; the creator of Firefox surely seems to think so.

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How Police Can Access Your Browser History

Can police get a glimpse of your browsing history? Usually, yes, and in more ways than one. The old-fashioned warrant works just fine, and lately governments have been passing legislation to institutionalise this practice to a scary extent (see UK ISP rules). They can access the contents of your computer and smartphone once these are seized, although the iPhone has been a harder nut to crack. They can also ask Google or Facebook to help them out - Google has processed a record requests for information from the government last year. A quick guide to the rules of the game.

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Maker Of Web Monitoring Software Can Be Sued, Says Court

Is digital monitoring legal? It depends on the circumstances. Indeed, in some cases, the user or the manufacturer of digital monitoring software were deemed guilty of illegal wiretapping. One of the most important aspects in the final ruling is: did the person that was being monitored have a reasonable expectation of privacy? When you are an employee using the company's computer and phone, the answer is almost automatically, no. But in the privacy of your own home, especially when you're using your own personal device, if you discover that someone has been tracking your activity without your permission, you have a reasonable chance of having a court rule in your favour.

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Can Business Intelligence Help You Manage Your Workforce Better

Companies use workflow monitoring software with three concerns in mind: security, reputation management, and productivity. An alphabet soup of software solutions are out there, each specialising in one or more of the aforementioned aspects of employee monitoring. But at the end of the day, remember that these are only tools, designed to be used by people. As a business owner, or a manager, it's your duty to properly introduce your employees to the software you've decided to use, and explain to them what you expect from them in return. Collaboration is the key to success.

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Pokemon Go Is Catching Personal Data From Your Smartphone

One of the most popular apps ever, had a huge security/privacy issue. Pokemon Go basically could know just about everything about its users, as it had nearly unlimited access to their Google account. This issue has been corrected since, as the developer, Nantic, acknowledged that the game could probably function without accessing your private files stored on Google Drive, or your browsing history.

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Google Is Bundling All Your Browsing History Data Together

Google starts to link your browsing history to your account, a shift from the traditional practice of linking it to your device - may it be your browser, or your YouTube app. This will make it easier for the Mountain View tech giant to understand every user, and to provide better search results - along with better targeted ads. People usually use Google's products - its search engine, Gmail, YouTube & al. on multiple devices, which leads to differences in user experience depending on what data the device has in store for personalisation purposes. Try googling anything on your smartphone, then your laptop, and the results will be different. By linking your browsing history to your account, Google will be able to harmonise the way its algorithms perform across devices for the same user.

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UK Spies Have More Data Than They Know What To Do With

The problem with widespread surveillance and digital monitoring is that government agencies end up with huge amounts of data without having the capabilities to properly analyse it. Collecting data is much easier than effectively finding ways to use it. On the one hand, that's reassuring, as even though our privacy is theoretically compromised by mass surveillance, in practice, we're safeguarded by the sheer amount of data that the collectors have to deal with. The obvious question is, then, why collect the data at the first place? "Because we can" is not a comforting answer.

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Schools Are Spying On Students' Social Media And Informing Police

Schools shouldn't be able to use digital evidence to expel their students. It's all too easy to cherry-pick evidence to get rid of the trouble-makers, or worse, students you just happen to dislike. Digital monitoring can be very useful to monitor behavioural trends and get a better grasp of the mindset of the kids you have a duty to protect and educate. But all kids say stupid things. It just so happens that they do it a lot online, and it leaves a trace that adults can pinpoint and blow out of proportion. And if you, as an adult, can't understand and deal with that fact, then you shouldn't be allowed anywhere near an educational institution.

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Mass Surveillance Has A "Chilling Effect" On Online Expression

Edward Snowden's leaks about NSA's mass surveillance are having a much deeper effect on us than most would assume. A series of studies have shown that people who know that they're being monitored - albeit by such a vague and abstract entity as "the government" - change their behaviour and start self-censoring themselves. In practice, this leads to much more restrained expression online, where people stop posting opinions that they think are dissenting from the mainstream. Everyone wants to project an image of himself as a "conformist", in a self-reinforcing trend: as everyone tries to adhere to a certain standard, even slightly dissenting views start to look outlandish.

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FTC Warns App Developers Against Using Audio Monitoring Software

Shadow app functionalities are an open secret in the app developers community. The scam goes like this. You write a random app that some people might download (and probably forget they've ever installed). The app has no monetization potential as it is. But it has a task running in the background, that the user is not aware of, that earns you money. It might crawl the Web for the benefit of its developer, show the user some ads, or be part of a VPN network, where the user's device functions as one of the proxies. It's a big issue, because the app shops (Google, Apple, etc.) have no means to know the real picture, and put their users at risk. In the example described here, an app was listening to the user's surroundings, to curate unwanted, targeted ads.

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Chrome Extension Allows Users To Share Browsing History With Friends And Public

Remember when blogs were mostly about sharing links you enjoyed with your friends, kind of like a public bookmark directory? Eyebrowse remembers. This app will help you share browsing information about websites you chose to whitelist with your friends, in an original project for collaborative content curation.

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Targeted Online Ads Can Actually Change How You See Yourself

The challenge for online advertisers is to know what you want before you want it, and submerge you with ads wherever you go on the Web. For this purpose, they gather as much data as possible about your habits, cross-reference them and compare to millions of other user profiles, to come up with ads you might be interested in. As a result, they might end up knowing you better than you know yourself.

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Your Smartphone Knows Who You Are and What You're Doing

Isn't it weird how the device that holds our most private and intimate information, is also the device that's the most "connected" to the outside world? People install hundreds of random apps on their smartphone without thinking for a second that at the same time, this piece of hardware knows their browsing history, their phone records, call and message logs, personal pictures, credit card and social security numbers... Twenty years ago, we would have kept all this information in a safe, locked in the basement. How times have changed.

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Child-Monitoring Company Responds To Notification Of Security Breach By Publicly Disparaging Researcher Who Reported It

Data protection is of the foremost concern for every company selling activity monitoring software. Especially when it's about monitoring children: the data is extremely sensitive. Imagine how parents would feel if you told them that their kid's pictures, GPS locations and text messages were stolen by a hacker.

This is why uKnowKids' reaction to a voluntary tip that their database was improperly configured, allowing potential leaks of data, is so disconcerting. Instead of thanking Mr Vickery, at the origin of the tip, the company decided to label him as a "hacker" in their official press release. Talk about shooting yourself in the foot, twice.

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Is Your Boss Reading Your Email?

The answer is: "probably yes", which can turn into "absolutely yes, if you've given him a reason to do that". Don't get it wrong, managers have better things to do than to spy on their subordinates, and most of them are creeped out by the idea. But they have to know what's going on in their team. Fifty years ago on a factory floor, it was easy, you just walked looking around, and you could see the bad habits and wrong attitudes and take action. But today, when most% of the time at the office is spent hiding behind a computer screen, managers have to gather information with other means. That's when monitoring and tracking comes into play.

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UK Politicians Green-Light Plans to Record Every Citizen's Internet History

The UK government is on track to officially institutionalise mass surveillance of its citizens. It took some time to twist the public opinion around, as similar laws had been struck down in the past. Ironically, the NSA whistle-blowing scandal that originated with Edward Snowden's huge leaks to the press about how US agencies were spying on just about everyone, seems to have helped pro-surveillance pundits. Indiscriminate digital monitoring is a given in everyone's psyche - so why fight it, because it's happening anyway. Ironically, some of the opponents to the bill were the tech giants - Google, Facebook and the like, that Snowden clearly identified as partners in crime with government agencies in conducting mass surveillance.

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UC Berkeley Profs Lambast New “Black Box” Network Monitoring Hardware

In an example of how not to introduce digital monitoring software into your organisation, University of California installed a system that takes a look at every packet that transits through the university's network. While the security concerns that prompted the new measure are perfectly understandable - the university underwent a large-scale hack last year - faculty staff are worried about the lack of transparency. It's not exactly clear how the system operates, or what data is being recorded and stored on third-party systems. Worse, indiscriminate surveillance always raises fears of censorship and overreach.

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Android Ransomware Sends Internet History To Phone Contacts

The 21st century worst nightmare is no longer being naked in a crowded room. It's your mom receiving an email with all your browsing history. That's the idea behind a malicious app that takes over your Android smartphone.

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What's The State Of Digital Privacy In America In 2016?

Whether it's Edward Snowden's NSA leaks, or never-ending scandals of hackers stealing user data from companies and websites, but US consumers are growing aware that information they share online will probably not be safe or private. At the same time, there's a huge education gap, as a majority of Internet users don't know what are cookies, private browsing, or location tracking on their smartphones.

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Microsoft Edge Browser Not Very Effective At Hiding Data In InPrivate Mode

Another "oops" moment from Microsoft. Their newest browser's Private Mode wasn't so private after all. User's private browsing history was still stored on the computer's hard drive, and although the user had the impression that his browsing wasn't being logged, anyone with knowledge of how Edge (Microsoft's latest browser) worked, could retrieve the logs. The question then is, why did Microsoft track Private Mode browsing at all?

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EU Ruling Says That Companies Can Monitor Employees' Private Online Communications

Legislation in Europe is catching up with the US, as employers are granted more rights to monitor their employees. The European Court of Human Rights dismissed the claims for privacy of Bogdan Mihai Barbulescu, who used the company's Yahoo Messenger account to chat with relatives. He was fired by his company over these actions, and the case set another precedent for using corporate infrastructure for personal communications.

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Almost Half Of Parents Know Their Teens' Email Password, Says Pew Survey

Digital monitoring software always raises concerns for privacy, with very good reasons. Kids and teens might be the exception to the rule, especially when it comes to monitoring by parents. Children don't have the same claim to privacy as adults, simply for their own good. That's why when a kid stands all by himself on the street, passers-by stop and ask him if he's lost, and where his parents are. So it's no surprise that parents spy on their children, one way or another. Kids in the US spent 7-8 hours per day in front of a screen, whether it's a TV, console, smartphone or computer. They are getting increasingly more information from outside sources. For parents, checking on their kids' online activity, with or without monitoring software, is just natural.

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The Independent Trolls The UK Government Over Browsing History Spying Bill

With the UK government busy catching up with the US and their ubiquitous NSA, the Independent decided to check just how transparent the "Snooper's Charter" really was. So they filed a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) request to get a peek at just one week's worth of Theresa May's (the Home Secretary's) browsing history. If privacy is to die under the strong grip of an Orwellian state, why not have some fun while it happens, right?

Well, what a surprise - the Home Office refused after almost two months of back-and-forth, citing that complying to such a request would impose an "unreasonable burden" upon the institution. Keep in mind that the Independent only asked for Mrs May's work logs - a far cry from what the British ISPs will have to store and provide to law enforcement upon simple request.

After making George Orwell's "1984" their field manual for invading everyone's lives, the government is apparently taking cue from "Animal Farm" for enacting its own policies. Because "all animals are equal, but some are more equal than others".

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Mozilla Updates Firefox, Abandons Thunderbird And Firefox OS

The Mozilla Foundation continues its war against trackers, with the latest version of its Firefox Web browser giving the user the option to block these scripts on websites they visit. A "tracker blocker" of sorts, much like the "ad blockers" that have spread since 2014. The question is, do users care anymore? While ads are actually annoying, few people even know what a tracker is. The Mozilla Foundation had advertised its "track the trackers" Firefox add-on a few years ago, but it failed to get traction after the initial hype and Ted talks by Mozilla's then-CEO Gary Kovacs.

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Why Online Tracking Could Hurt the Future of Media Companies

Publishers have been tying a rope around their own necks since the dawn of the Web. Late to the content monetization party, they have seen their revenues shrink, while getting only droplets out of the online advertising bonanza. Desperate for new sources revenue, they are partnering with ever shadier online players. One such category are online tracking services, companies that specialise in behavioural data collection. You know that annoying online ad that's been following you for the last two weeks, insisting that you should buy that pair or red leather boots? Someone leaked your reading on an online blog, and now you're paying for it.

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If The UK Government Collects Browsing Data, One Day It Will Become Public

In a world where just about every company is trying to collect your data, while just about every hacker is trying to steal it from them, how much privacy can you really expect? Edward Snowden proved that the NSA was much better at collecting and storing data than protecting it. Now, a new UK law will require Internet Service providers (ISPs) to keep everyone's browsing history for 12 months, in case a government agency needs to access these records in an investigation. How long before all this data gets stolen, and put online, for everyone to see?

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Government’s Investigatory Powers Bill To Require ISP Storage Of Browsing History

Details are emerging about the new UK government's mass surveillance bill. Among other things, the government calls for cooperation from intermediaries, such as Internet Service Providers (ISPs), in collecting and storing data. Government's officials seem to follow the handbook for passing unpopular, privacy-threatening bills: "don't worry, we will hardly collect anything, and if you don't agree, that means you want to help terrorists."

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Vodafone, Sky Might Have To Store Data On Users' Web History

The latest UK mass surveillance law would require Internet Service Providers (ISPs) to collect and keep everyone's browsing history data for 12 months, in case government agencies need to access the records in an investigation. This apparently concerns just about everything we do online, from websites we visit, to Google Maps activity, to Facebook and WhatsApp messages.

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South Korea Considers Opt Out For Child Monitoring App

Going full Big Brother, South Korea passed a law earlier this year that obliged parents to install content filtering software on their kids' smartphones. Civil rights issues put aside, it appears now that the move was a huge mistake on another front, too. Content filtering software companies took advantage of the law, and started collecting huge amounts of information about their users. Worse, they exposed their users to security flaws, putting them at risk of being hacked.

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UK Police Push For Powers To Access Your Web Browsing History For The Last Year

UK police is trying to take advantage of the latest government mass surveillance bill to have the right to take a peek into every UK citizen's Internet history. And by "peek", I mean browsing history, messages, emails, just about everything. And they want to be granted that capability without even having a warrant. Police state, anyone?

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Changing Company Culture - The Key To Fighting Insider Fraud

Employee tracking software is only a tool. Even when they know that they're being monitored, employees only marginally change their behaviour. It is the role of management to regularly point out their bad habits, or take action when employees fail to better themselves. Most cases of corporate malfeasance or fraud start small, and grow over time. Management needs to keep their guard up at all times, to spot and put an end to bad practices before these grow out of control.

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You Can Be Prosecuted for Clearing Your Browser History

Destruction of evidence is a crime. Under the Sarbanes-Oxley act of 2002, prosecutors no longer have to show that the person who destroyed evidence knew that a federal investigation was taking place. The bill, which was adopted in reaction to accounting fraud scandals such as Enron and Worldcom, is being used to a much wider extent, particularly to make it illegal to destroy or alter digital content. This practice is coming under closer scrutiny, as the law was intended to fight white collar crime, and its use as a way to manufacture charges for destroying digital records may be seen as far-fetched. To the extreme, this might mean that you could be charged for deleting the calls log on your smartphone after a conversation with someone who was under federal investigation, even if you had no way of knowing that.

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